Late Summer Walking

Artisanal, tucked-away trailhead sign for the Gable Lakes Trail. The bone is a nice touch.
Artisanal, tucked-away trailhead sign for the Gable Lakes Trail. The bone is a nice touch.

It’s still definitely summery out there, even though it’s September. The Sierra and the Inyo Mountains beckon, with plenty of on- and off-trail rambling to go around. Pictures from recent jaunts up to Gable Lakes (out of Pine Creek Canyon near Bishop) and upper Marble Canyon, in the Inyo Mountains near where we walked in 2008, are featured here.

gable lakes

Steep trail provides views almost right away of Pine Creek Canyon.
Steep trail provides views almost right away of Pine Creek Canyon.
Some of the old tramway works to the upper tungsten mines are still standing.
Some of the old tramway works to the upper tungsten mines are still standing.
Quaint! Well ventilated! Views! Hantavirus!
Quaint! Well ventilated! Views! Hantavirus!
*Some furniture included.
*Some furniture included.
Who drew the short straw to schlep this thing from the valley floor (~7,000') to here, at almost 11,000', to prospect for tungsten?
Who drew the short straw to schlep this thing from the valley floor (~7,000′) to here, at almost 11,000′, to prospect for tungsten?
Two of the several Gable Lakes, at ~11,000'.
Two of the several Gable Lakes, at ~11,000′.
Impressive washout, mile 4, Waucoba-Saline Valley Road. Although I'm sure the Subaru could have jumped all this, given enough speed, we decided to park and walk from here.
Impressive washout, mile 4, Waucoba-Saline Valley Road. Although I’m sure the Subaru could have jumped all this, given enough speed, we decided to park and walk from here.

Upper marble canyon

We did a nice walk on Labor Day off the Waucoba/Saline Valley Road, an unpaved road that forks off the paved Death Valley Road to drop into Saline Valley itself. We got about 4 miles down this road before a large washout stopped us. We’d only planned to drive about 5 miles anyway, so it wasn’t a big deal to walk.

We ended up doing a longer-than-planned-but-still-fun loop up Upper Marble Canyon (we’d walked its lower section in 2008), with the bonus that it had recently flash-flooded and was still wet and mud covered. Impressive limestone cliffs and some pretty narrow sections too!

Cutting cross country to drop into upper Marble Canyon.
Cutting cross country to drop into upper Marble Canyon.
A hole to nowhere appears amidst some random mining junk.
A hole to nowhere appears amidst some random mining junk.
Checking out the hole but not going all the way to another dimension.
Checking out the hole but not going all the way to another dimension.
A very recent flash flood left this canyon pretty wet and muddy.
A very recent flash flood left this canyon pretty wet and muddy.

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